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Vince Germain is a webcomic written and drawn by Charlie Stickney that updates as frequently as life and (more importantly) his children, permit. The story follows the fedora and trench-coatted adventures of the titular character who wears them. The world of Vince Germain is at times strange, bizarre and occasionally mundane.

More about Charlie

Charlie Stickney is an award-winning writer and filmmaker who spends time moonlighting as a cartoonist. His career began in animation where he developed and ran the series Horrible Histories and later on Cosmic Quantum RayCharlie has written scripts for Sony Pictures, Revolution Studios, Everyman Pictures, Scholastic Productions, Abu Media, YRF Entertainment, and Mike Young Productions.  If, for some strange reason, you really want to know more about Charlie, you can visit charliestickney.com

More about Vince

Growing up in Maine, I used to frequent an old used bookstore that had a fairly large selection of criminally under-priced comic books stuffed into long boxes stacked at the end of an aisle of science fiction paperbacks.  After one day of cherry-picking titles that I was sure would eventually appreciate into my retirement fund, (still waiting on that appreciating) I came across several bundles of newspapers from the 1940's.  In particular my attention was drawn to a comic by Hollis Janning -- Vince Germain, Investigator of the Strange, Bizarre and Mundane. I'd never heard of Vince Germain before, but something about the strip drew me in.

“The Case of the Signal Carrier” - January 11, 1941

A bit more about Vince

I wasn't the only one. For two and a half years, between 1941 and 1944, Vince Germain was one of the most popular comic strips in the country.  Through a sponsorship deal with Breemaxx, (Of Breemaxx Super Adhesive Cellophane Tape fame) the comic launched a radio show, toy line and ultimately a feature film. Unfortunately, Vince was a cautionary tale of too big too fast. In 1944 Breemaxx had to file for bankruptcy and took Vince Germain with it.  Thankfully, after much googling and visits to the archives of the Chicago Tribune, I was able to track down Dorthy Janning,  Hollis' granddaughter and acquire the rights to bring Vince Germain back for the 21st century.

Vince Germain is a webcomic written and drawn by Charlie Stickney that updates as frequently as life and (more importantly) his children, permit. The story follows the fedora and trench-coatted adventures of the titular character who wears them. The world of Vince Germain is at times strange, bizarre and occasionally mundane.

More about Charlie

Charlie Stickney is an award-winning writer and filmmaker who spends time moonlighting as a cartoonist. His career began in animation where he developed and ran the series Horrible Histories and later on Cosmic Quantum RayCharlie has written scripts for Sony Pictures, Revolution Studios, Everyman Pictures, Scholastic Productions, Abu Media, YRF Entertainment, and Mike Young Productions.  If, for some strange reason, you really want to know more about Charlie, you can visit charliestickney.com

More about Vince

Growing up in Maine, I used to frequent an old used bookstore that had a fairly large selection of criminally under-priced comic books stuffed into long boxes stacked at the end of an aisle of science fiction paperbacks.  After one day of cherry-picking titles that I was sure would eventually appreciate into my retirement fund, (still waiting on that appreciating) I came across several bundles of newspapers from the 1940's.  In particular my attention was drawn to a comic by Hollis Janning -- Vince Germain, Investigator of the Strange, Bizarre and Mundane. I'd never heard of Vince Germain before, but something about the strip drew me in.

“The Case of the Signal Carrier”

January 11, 1941

A bit more about Vince

I wasn't the only one. For two and a half years, between 1941 and 1944, Vince Germain was one of the most popular comic strips in the country.  Through a sponsorship deal with Breemaxx, (Of Breemaxx Super Adhesive Cellophane Tape fame) the comic launched a radio show, toy line and ultimately a feature film. Unfortunately, Vince was a cautionary tale of too big too fast. In 1944 Breemaxx had to file for bankruptcy and took Vince Germain with it.  Thankfully, after much googling and visits to the archives of the Chicago Tribune, I was able to track down Dorthy Janning,  Hollis' granddaughter and acquire the rights to bring Vince Germain back for the 21st century.